Paul Dreyer

Born in South Africa, Paul moved to the United States as a small child, and has continued to seek out travel, adventure, and education ever since. A self-proclaimed “mercenary” educator and coach, Paul has had the opportunity to work with numerous organizations and to support a diverse spectrum of clients.
Paul has worked throughout the world as a facilitator, curriculum designer, guide, expeditionary leader, risk management consultant, staff trainer, and team builder.
Currently, in addition to his consulting work, Paul serves as the CEO of Avid4 Adventure, helping support the mission to empower kids to lead active and healthy lifestyles in the outdoors.

Recent Posts

Transforming Expertise into Mastery

Sep 19, 2018 by Paul Dreyer in leadership & facilitation (3 minute read)

The Lucid Meetings team is thrilled to introduce Paul Dreyer.

Our founder Elise Keith met Paul when visiting Zingerman's. At the time, Paul was visiting Zingerman's to see how they'd evolved their training practice, and Elise was conducting research for Where the Action Is.  

They got to talking about the Conscious Competence Ladder, a tool they'd both used for training meetings. Paul shared how he'd developed an updated version of the model for use in his work - and yes, it's way better! He's generously agreed to share this updated model with the Lucid community. Thank you, Paul! 

When I first learned about the "Conscious Competence Ladder” of becoming an expert, I loved it.

I immediately added it to my leadership and communication tool box. Whether I was learning something myself or facilitating a training on leadership development, I would often point to this model as an effective and powerful awareness tool.

Sometimes also referred to as the "Conscious Competence Matrix” or the "Four Stages of Learning," this model helps us  better understand the struggling landscape we must travel when learning something new.

Of course, I was not alone. Since it was developed in the 1970s, the Conscious Competence Ladder has become a widely used and loved tool. From classrooms to boardrooms to best-selling books on communication (i.e. Malcolm Gladwell's Blink), this model seems to show up everywhere.

Unfortunately, it's incomplete and actually not a good model. Let me show you how to transform the model into something better.

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Topics: leadership & facilitation